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NEW HOME! Check it out!


Fusion Culinaire now has a new home, a self-hosted version which can be found at http://fusionculinaire.com http://food.stephendowell.com.

The WordPress.com site will be kept public, for a while at least, but will eventually be re-directed to the new location. All new posts will be at the new domain.

Hope to see you there!

Steve D.

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Spicy Dr. Pepper Ribs


Baby-Back-Ribs

A taste of the Oklahoma ranch, I just had to re-blog this from Pioneer Woman. The Dr. Pepper makes it especially unique.

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Muncie (Little Chicago) Style Pizza


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Back in the 1920’s and 1930’s, Muncie, Indiana (my hometown), came to be known as “Little Chicago” because of it’s ties to mob activities in the “City of Broad Shoulders”, Chicago, Illinois. Here is a personal pizza recipe, based on the traditional Chicago deep-dish style with a twist of Appalachia (cast-iron skillet). DO try this at home!

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Sauteed Zucchini, Squash Medley


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This is a recipe that I jotted down from memory after successfully creating a sauteed vegetable medley from some recently grown vegetables that just happened to avail themselves. The results were favorable – everyone who partook agreed!

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Creole Jambalaya


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A dish with French and Spanish origins, jambalaya is basically a meat usually consisting of ham (“jambo”, French), smoked sausage and/or chicken, with (“ala”, French “in the style of”) rice (“ya”, West African language). There are 3 distinct varieties of Jambalaya; creole, cajun and white. The creole style tends to be less spicy with more tomato, whereas Cajun (slang for “Acadian”) tends to be more spicy – an influence carried over from the early days of French settlers from the Acadia region of Canada migrating into the tropical regions of Charlestown, South Carolina, and the swamps of southern Louisiana.

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Spicy/Sweet Rack of Lamb


Men's Journal  The Spicey-Sweet Lamb Rack

Men’s Journal
The Spicey-Sweet Lamb Rack

Here’s another awesome winner found through Men’s Journal magazine! This lamb ribs recipe from Trencherman, Chicago, may be slightly labor intensive, but will prove to be worth every bit of the effort.

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French Press – The Best Way to Enjoy Good Coffee!


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For many years, when I wasn’t drinking beer (weekends), I was drinking coffee (work week). Being that I am no longer young, I have grown rather educated in the methods of brewing and varieties of, coffee. The usage of the French press is the best, because it cuts down on the bitterness and the temperature is perfecto!

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Sauteed Mushrooms


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Sauteed mushrooms make a wonderful accompaniment to many dishes, this versatile method goes well with red or white meat entrees.

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Louisiana Red Beans & Rice


Image source: chez loulou on flickr.com (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0).

Image source: chez loulou on flickr.com (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0).

An authentic Louisiana recipe, this is one of my all time favorites! Though it may be fairly time consuming project (3 hours or so), it is well worth the effort!
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Pennsylvania Dutch Shoo-fly Pie


Image: jonk on flickr.com (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Image: jonk on flickr.com
(CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

After venturing to northern Indiana for an annual Auburn Classic Automobile Auction in the early 1970s, Dad and I stopped at a roadside restaurant on our trip back where we sampled shoo-fly pie. There is much Amish influence in that area, and this particular dessert became a life-time favorite for me and my father.
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Speckled Trout Tchoupitoulas


Straight from a restaurateur and true Cajun from Lake Charles named Nate, this dish is a bona fide example of the tastes of Southern Louisiana.
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Le Persil Fleur – Paris


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In the late summer of 1983 my father and I, accompanied by his wife, spent 10 days in Paris, France. One evening mid-way through our visit we ventured to a small, quaint, restaurant just around the corner from our hotel on the Rue de Caumartin near the Palais Garnier (Opera House) called Le Persil Fleur.

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Boef En Croute aka Beef Wellington


A specialty dish, Beef Wellington is contrived from many ingredients from the Perigord region of southwest France which is known for it’s abundance of truffles. The name may refer to Arthur Wellesley, the Duke of Wellington, theoretically evolving from British campaigns into France during the Napoleonic Wars, though that has been reputed over the years and the name attributed to a civic dining engagement in Wellington, New Zealand. The true origination of the name has never been proven.

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Dining in Dallas


As a Dallasite for nearly a quarter of a century, I was afforded the opportunity to critique’ practically every dining establishment worth mentioning in the entire DFW metroplex, first-hand. One of the highest rated was the 5 star French Room at the Adolphus Hotel in downtown Dallas. Only a couple of times did I venture into the French Room though the Hotel had a couple of other establishments that I frequented quite often. The Bistro Cafe across the parlor from the French Room and Walt Garrison’s Rodeo Bar & Grill down on the street level both had their own unique atmosphere, and not to mention, menu pricing. Continue Reading »

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Old World German Sauerbraten


Many years ago, my supervisor took vacation to travel back to her point of origin, “das Vaterland”, to visit her volks. When she returned, she shared this family recipe with me.

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"King’s Arms Tavern" Peanut Soup


“King’s Arms Tavern” is a nationally reknowned establishment in Williamsburg, VA. The tavern was a favorite dining spot for our country’s father, George Washington and the peanut soup is a legendary treat. Continue Reading »

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Chicken Marengo


Stating at the onset of the Italian campaign of 1800 that he could prepare chicken a different way for 365 consecutive days, “Chicken Marengo” earned it’s name from the dish created by Napoleon’s personal chef on the eve of the French victory over the Austrians at the battle of Marengo, Italy. Continue Reading »

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Old World German Sauerbraten


Many years ago, my supervisor took vacation to travel back to her point of origin, “der Vaterland”, to visit her “volks”. When she returned, she presented me with this family recipe.

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Chef John Folse “A Taste of Louisiana”


John Folse is another cajun with a TV cooking show. Chef Folse arrived on the TV cooking scene a little later than Justin Wilson, the “Cookin’ Cajun”, but was just as inspirational. Folse shows a more professional demeanor, more along the lines of legendary Chef Paul Prudhomme, the creator of “Blackened Redfish” (discovered by accident).

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Justin Wilson “Cookin’ Cajun”


Justin Wilson "Cookin' Cajun"

Justin Wilson “Cookin’ Cajun”

When I moved to Texas in the early 1980s, Justin Wilson was popular in the region. With his new cooking program on PBS, his popularity was spreading nationwide.

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Now that’s a burger (at Lomito’s)


Reminds me of the Judge Roy Bean’s challenge in Dallas years ago – you’d have a cholesterol hangover for days!

Matt on Not-WordPress

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Pecan Pie, Texas Style


Care for Some Pecan Pie? Image - museinthecity on flickr.com (CC by 2.0)

Care for Some Pecan Pie?
Image – museinthecity on flickr.com (CC by 2.0)

As I noticed a large bag of plain pecans in the cupboard, I got the idea to make a pie with them. Here’s how I did it!

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Stevarino’s Crock Pot Roast


Stevarino's Crock Pot Roast

Stevarino’s Crock Pot Roast

I threw this together years ago when I was moving and had to clean out the fridge and freezer. It served a dual purpose project in that I was able to coax some friends into help pack and move with the aid of the aroma given off by this “pot luck” conglomeration.

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